• The River Lea

  • Humans and nature

    "In this actual world there is then not much point in counter-posing or restating the great abstractions of Man and Nature. We have mixed our labour with the earth, our forces with its forces too deeply to be able to draw back and separate either out." - Raymond Williams (1980)
  • Favourate Quote:

    We end, I think, at what might be called the standard paradox of the twentieth century: our tools are better than we are, and grow better faster than we do. They suffice to crack the atom, to command the tides. But they do not suffice for the oldest task in human history: to live on a piece of land without spoiling it." - Aldo Leopold (1938)
  • Lea Valley and River Photos

Going Digital

General Digital Research Information:

Finding Primary Sources in British History:

Web:

  • The internet archive has a huge collection of out of copyright published books and pamphlets that can be downloaded as PDF or ePub files. You can find anything from classic books by Charles Dickens and J.S. Mill to lesser known travel narratives describing parts of Britain in the mid-nineteenth century. Google and Microsoft helped digitize almost all the books in some of America’s largest libraries, so the collection is very large and growing. It also has a collection of audio and film that might include early audio recordings, such as this collection of Churchill’s war time speeches.
  • Google Books has many of the same books and pamphlets as the Internet Archive, but sometimes the better search engine makes it easier to find something. However, it does not offer as many download options as the Internet Archive.
  • Project Gutenberg has a similar collection of out of copyright books.
  • British History Online hosts a large collection of both primary and secondary sources. This includes an impressive collection of Maps and Surveys for local history projects.
  • Another great local history resource is the Vision of Britain that brings together census statistics, maps and descriptions of cities, parishes and towns in Britain.

York Library Website:

3 Responses

  1. […] database and mapping software makes it possible to manipulate data quickly and efficiently.  Jim Clifford has put together a concise introduction to some of these resources on his […]

  2. […] database and mapping software makes it possible to manipulate data quickly and efficiently.  Jim Clifford has put together a concise introduction to some of these resources on his […]

  3. You’re an awesome, awesome nerd.

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